Cheese Care

Cheese CareCheese can be a little bit tricky to take care of. Here are a few tips to help you on your way.

Cheese that is made in large quantities in factories is, by its design, meant to taste the same each time it is eaten, and is suitable for storing in a fridge. Handmade cheese is less predictable and its taste and texture is much more variable.

Have a cellar then look no further!

The dark humid conditions of the cellar are ideal for cheese. Keep a check on your cheese and if it looks like it is sweating or getting clammy then you may need to search for a cooler spot. Surface mould is often a sign of high levels of humidity and is nothing to worry about, just scrape it off and enjoy.

In the Fridge

Storage in the fridge is often the best option for most people.Soft cheeses tends to prefer lower temperature and the fridge is a good place for them.  Cool and away from pests it provides a safe place for a piece of cheese. It also slows down any maturation that is taking place increasing its shelf life. However it can cause cheese to dry out and develop cracking. If this happens you can sometimes rescue it by placing a damp clean muslin cloth over it and hoping for the best: or start making cheese on toast.!

In the Larder/Garage/Sheds/Unheated rooms/Car Boots

Little shop of cheese customers seem ever so inventive when it comes to finding the perfect home for their cheeses. All of the above can make good places for stashing you cheese, but warm weather can catch us all out. As can forgetting about it, only to rediscover it some months later.

in the words of one wise customer
if your cheese looks like it wants to get up and walk, let it go..

Wrapping

The wax paper that we use allows the cheese to breath without causing the sweating so commonly associated with cling film. We are more than happy to provide additional pieces of wax paper when customers make their purchases, just give us a nudge and we will pop some more wax paper in your bag.

Soft blue cheeses (such as Oxford Blue) store very well in tin foil.